Call Us Today! Get a Free Consultation!
(844) 461-2831

An Eating Disorder in People With Diabetes

The first time she skipped an insulin dose, the 22-year-old said, it wasn’t planned. She was visiting her grandparents over a summer break from college and indulged in bags of potato chips and fistfuls of candy, but forgot to take the extra insulin that people with Type 1 diabetes, like her, require to keep their blood sugar levels in a normal range.
She was already underweight after months of extreme dieting, but when she stepped on the scale the next day, she saw she had dropped several pounds overnight. “I put two and two together,” said the young woman, who lives in Boston and wished to remain anonymous.
She soon developed a dangerous habit that she used to drive her weight down: She would binge, often consuming an entire pint of Ben & Jerry’s peanut butter cup ice cream, and then would deliberately skip the insulin supplements she needed.
People with Type 1 diabetes, who don’t produce their own insulin, require continuous treatments with the hormone in order to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells. When they skip or restrict their insulin, either by failing to take shots or manipulating an insulin pump, it causes sugars — and calories — to spill into the urine, causing rapid weight loss.
But the consequences can be fatal. “I knew I was playing with fire, but I wasn’t thinking about my life, just my weight,” said the young woman, who was treated at The Renfrew Center of Boston, which specializes in treating eating disorders, and is in recovery. “I got used to my blood sugars running high all the time. I would get so nauseous I would throw up, which I knew was a serious sign that I should go to the hospital. It was very scary.”
The eating disorder the young woman developed is unique to people with Type 1 diabetes and has been called diabulimia, though it is not a recognized medical condition. (People with Type 2 diabetes who take insulin do not have the same rapid response to insulin restriction.) It occurs when patients manipulate their insulin in order to purge calories, much as someone with bulimia might induce vomiting to lose weight.
Insulin restriction can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition that develops when the body lacks insulin and starts to break down fat, producing ketones that can poison the body. It also increases the risk of serious long-term complications of diabetes, including kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, amputations and heart disease.

Read More: http://nyti.ms/2HfronA
Shared from: nytimes.com

2018-03-12T17:29:41+00:00